Author: AVMA

Vaccines and pet health

Vaccines have played a major role in preventing disease and improving public health around the world. These benefits have been extended to our pets as well, helping to protect them from viruses such as rabies, distemper, and parvovirus. There is, however, a small but vocal anti-vaccination movement that questions the necessity of vaccines, and veterinary medicine may not be immune from this movement; New York magazine recently reported that some veterinarians have noticed an uptick in the number of pets that are not being vaccinated, due to a similar anti-vaccination ideology. In this podcast, Dr. Laurel Gershwin, a member of AVMA’s Council on Biologic and Therapeutic Agents, discusses the importance of vaccinations for our pets.

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National Pet Dental Health Month 2015

February 1 marks the beginning of National Pet Dental Health Month. More than just a cosmetic issue, yellow teeth and bad breath can be a sign of serious disease in our pets, which may affect their kidneys, livers, and hearts. Oral disease is the most …

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New Year’s Resolutions for Your Pets

Will you be one of the millions of people making New Year’s Resolutions this year? If so, have you thought about including your pets in your New Year’s resolutions? Perhaps by partnering with a furry friend, you’ll be more inclined to stick to those healthy promises you made. And just like us, most of our pets could benefit from shedding a few pounds and spending more time being active. In this podcast, AVMA CEO Dr. Ron DeHaven talks about making New Year’s resolutions for your pets.

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Breed-specific legislation

Across the country, communities have attempted to reduce the incidence of serious and fatal dog bites by restricting the ownership of certain types of dogs, most often pit bulls. But others, including some states, have made these types of breed-specifi…

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Ebola and pets update: October 17, 2014

A nurse in Texas became infected with Ebola this week while treating another patient, who later died. This led to an important question: What to do with the nurse’s dog, who may have been exposed to the virus? The dog is currently being observed in iso…

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